• Home
  • Nonfiction 4
  • A laboratory of transpersonal history. Ukraine and recent by Edited by G. Kasianov and P. Ther

A laboratory of transpersonal history. Ukraine and recent by Edited by G. Kasianov and P. Ther

By Edited by G. Kasianov and P. Ther

Show description

Read or Download A laboratory of transpersonal history. Ukraine and recent ukrainian historiography. PDF

Best nonfiction_4 books

Scourge of the Slavelords Supermodule A1-4 (Advanced Dungeons and Dragons)

The thoroughly revised Aerie of the Slavelords sequence of adventures. New demanding situations and eventualities detailing the Wild Coast, the town of Highport, the blasted lands of the Pomarj and the Drachensgrab Mountains.

Rolemaster: School of Hard Knocks, the Skill Companion

Do you need characters to count extra upon their innate ability than upon magic? ailing and bored with characters with a spell for each get together? do you need spell clients to dread the dire results of misusing robust magic? if this is the case, this is often the ebook for you! extend the scope of non spell clients on your video game with 4 new professions: Barbarian, Swashbuckler, Sneak, and Sage.

Additional resources for A laboratory of transpersonal history. Ukraine and recent ukrainian historiography.

Sample text

18 See Dieter Pohl, Nationalsozialistische Judenverfolgung in Ostgalizien 1941–1944. Organisation und Durchführung eines staatlichen Massenverbrechens (Munich, 1996). 19 See Philipp Ther’s provocative suggestion to rethink much of German history as imperial in his article “Imperial Instead of National History: Positioning Modern German History on the Map of European Empires,” in Imperial Rule, eds. Alexei Miller and Alfred J. Rieber (Budapest and New York, 2004), pp. 47–66. 20 See Anna Veronika Wendland, Die Russophilen in Galizien.

Historiography has remained at the forefront of my research and teaching. 5 See especially the defensive response of Yaroslav Isaievych, then the dean of Ukrainian historians at the National Academy of Sciences in Kyiv, though a Lviv-based scholar himself. From the Russian historians’ side, even the reply of my friend and colleague Yuri Slezkine was a mild form of the harsher charge I heard from Russianist colleagues that I had “betrayed” Russian history and been seduced by the false siren of the Ukrainian nationalists.

But also in “Writing the History of Russia as Empire: The Perspective of Federalism,” in Kazan, Moscow, St. Petersburg: Multiple Faces of the Russian Empire, eds. Boris Gasparov et al. (Moscow, 1997), pp. 393–410, and most recently in “Empires, Borderlands, and Diasporas: Eurasia as AntiParadigm for the Post-Soviet Era,” American Historical Review 109, no. 2 (April 2004): 445–68. 30 At Columbia University I taught with Michael Stanislawski, a specialist in Russian and East European Jewish history; with Karen Barkey, a historical sociologist and Ottomanist; with Frank Sysyn, who has a breadth in Ukrainian history that far surpasses my own in Russian history; with Richard Wortman, a distinguished historian of imperial Russia; and with Catharine Nepomnyashchy, a specialist in Russian, Slavic and comparative literature.

Download PDF sample

Rated 4.56 of 5 – based on 9 votes