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An Introduction to the Comparative Grammar of the Semitic by Sabatino Moscati, Wolfram Von Soden, Anton Spitaler,

By Sabatino Moscati, Wolfram Von Soden, Anton Spitaler, Professor Emeritus of Semitic Languages and of Ethiopian Studies Edward Ullendorff

An advent to the Comparative Grammar of the Semitic Languages

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Additional resources for An Introduction to the Comparative Grammar of the Semitic Languages: Phonology and Morphology (Porta Linguarum Orientalium)

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G. g. dilk "to kill", bni "to build"). 6 c), so that the incorporation of original semivowel radicals (dwk, bny) may be ascribed to artificial reconstruction. g. Sem. kalb "dog") which have to be differentiated from the verbal ones which, in their turn, are to be divided into those indicating states or conditions and those connoting actions (cf. 2). The distinction between the three semantic spheres of noun, adjective and stative verb, and active verb is reflected in a differentiation in the structure of the root.

Aaa~ for Yi§lyiiq (and cf. later on Syr. '/sl}aq). 8. g. Ar. *kawy "burning" > kayy. g. Akk. *iwbil "he carried" > ubil (reciprocal assimilation), *baytu "house" > bitu (total regressive assimilation). Of. 97-104. 2. 9. 10. g. Ar. g. Ar. layl "night", lUn "to spend the night" (Heb. lUn, lin, Ug. g. Akk. g. g. Sem. *sams "sun" > Ar. *sams (n > sams, cf. Akk. samsu, Ug. sps. 11. g. *wawaqi "ounces" > 'awaqi (regressive and at distance). 12. g. Ar. *madiniy "Medinese" > madaniy > madaniy (qualitative and quantitative).

The process continues in some modern dialects and becomes operative also in foreign borrowings such as the modern Eastern Aramaic 'us tal "table" from the Russian stol. Further examples in Ullendorff, SLE, pp. 198-201. g. g. *bayt "house" > bayit); cf. 100. g. *'abd "slave" > *'abed > 'abed. 60 n. 18. In Arabic the case-endings prevent the formation of consonant clusters at the end of a word: 'abd un and 'abd u "slave", rigl un and rigl U "foot". A special situation may, however, arise as a consequence of the effects of sentence stress (cf.

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